Posts Tagged ‘TRADERS POINT CREAMERY’

Creamery event benefits Historic Traders Point!

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

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Sunday, October 26th, 2008 from 12 to 6 pm Traders Point Creamery will be hosting Oktoberfest once again. This is truly the most fabulous, fun-filled day on the farm!
Enjoy the Live Music of PolkaBoy’s 13-piece Power Band, Hayrides, Bonfires, Cow Milking, Pumpkin Patch, Face Painting, Games, Pet the Baby Calves and more. You may also sample our Award-winning Organic Dairy Products that are made right on the farm!

Traditional German Food, Beer, and Wine available for purchase, as well as Traders Point Creamery Ice Cream, Delicious Cheeses, Baked Goods, Hot Chocolate, and more! Drink local beer and enjoy Upland Brewing Co., of Bloomington, Indiana—it is delicious!
Oktoberfest is a fundraiser to protect over 7,000 acres of remaining greenspace in Traders Point Rural Historic Districts and surrounding areas.
Tickets are $8 in Advance online and $10 at the Gate. Children under 10 years free. http://www.tpforganics.com/content/view/73/200/

Traders Point Creamery rates a perfect FIVE COWS!

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Monday, June 30, 2008

Study finds organic milk contains better nutrients
By Shari Rudavsky shari.rudavsky@indystar.com
A recent study bolsters the argument that the text beneath the white mustache on the well-known ads should be amended to read, “Got organic milk?”
Natural-food aficionados, organic dairy farmers and some nutritionists have long argued that organic milk is healthier than its conventional counterpart because it does not contain substances such as antibiotics.
Now, there’s an increasing body of evidence to show that organic milk contains some beneficial substances that other milk lacks.
A recent study by a researcher at Newcastle University (United Kingdom) sheds light on what’s so special about organic milk. Cows that graze on real grass and clover produce milk that contains more antioxidants, vitamins and the good-for-you fatty acids.
The study found that the milk of these cows was particularly nutrient-rich in the summer, when they had the greatest access to fresh grass. During this season, the milk contained 60 percent more of the fatty acid CLA.
This finding did not surprise Mark Kastel, co-director of the Cornucopia Institute, a Wisconsin-based watchdog for the organic industry.
Such thinking has helped draw more consumers to organic milk and through this to more organic products in general, he says.
“The first part is about protecting your health and your family’s health by avoiding chemicals that are known to be deleterious,” Kastel says.
“There’s also a growing body of scientific literature that indicates organic food is healthier for you.”
Research shows that organic milk has lower levels of pesticides and fungicides, many of which can be considered to be carcinogens.
Other chemicals found in conventional milk are suspected of triggering developmental problems by mimicking hormones, Kastel says.
So, many households are turning to organic milk.
From 2004 to 2005, sales of organic milk increased by 25 percent, surpassing $1 billion, according to a May 2007 report from the USDA’s economic research service. Overall sales of milk remained constant.
But not all organic milk is created equal, the Cornucopia Institute has found. The institute has produced an organic dairy scorecard (using cow icons) to rate organic brands on just how organic they truly are.
Zionsville’s Traders Point Creamery, the only Indiana-based one on the list, rates a perfect five cows.
The institute plans to update the scorecard, available at www .cornucopia.org, in the coming month.

Landscape Architecture Students and Traders Point!

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Monday, April 28, 2008

Over the previous 3 months, three Purdue University Landscape Architecture students have been working on a project regarding the Traders Point Triangle area, an area ranging from Lafayette Road on the south to Hunt Club Road on the north. Their main objective is to provide the community, its leaders and potential developers with an insight to what Traders Point could and should be, paying respect to the natural and historic character of the area. They are working under the belief that the need for preservation and smart growth of the land is apparent as valued open space and woodlands are rapidly giving way to suburban sprawl. Two of the students are local, one from Zionsville and one from Traders Point, and therefore have a vested interest in the area!

The students will be sharing their findings/presentation with us at The Creamery at 6:30pm on Tuesday, April 29th. The presentation is titled “Preservation Methods, Comprehensive Planning & Establishing Community Identity”. Please join them for this hour presentation. They have worked long and hard and it would be great to encourage continued support and new ideas from the next generation! Some of their “Context and Goals” posters are currently on display at The Creamery.

See you then!

Creamery's market keeps growing . . .

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Friday, March 14, 2008

Traders Point Creamery’s market keeps growing through winter
By Susan H. Miller
Indy Star correspondent
March 13, 2008
Farmers markets flourish in every community throughout the spring, summer and early fall, but there is one farmers market that courts consumers year-round.
Traders Point Creamery, just south of Zionsville on Moore Road, provides space inside a heated barn for local farmers to sell their products Saturday mornings from November through April. In the summer, the market moves outside and switches to Friday evenings.
Besides being the only year-round farmers market in the area, it’s also the only one exclusively for organic growers. Farmers who use pesticides and chemicals on their produce, or growth hormones in their meat, aren’t allowed to market their products at Traders Point.
There aren’t many fruits and vegetables to be had in the dead of winter, but these farmers have proven themselves resourceful.
Redwine Farm in Westfield sells dried versions of the same fresh produce it sells in summer — tomatoes, green peppers, jalapeno peppers, banana peppers — “anything you can grow in Indiana,” Jacob Redwine said.
All the dried vegetables Redwine sells in winter can be reconstituted in soups and stews. He grinds some of the dried vegetables and puts them in jars for consumers to use in cooking.
Another local farm has found a way to grow some of its produce year-round. Homestead Growers in Sheridan, owned by Anita and Steve Spencer, built a specially equipped barn to grow exotic mushrooms, such as shiitake and oyster mushrooms. In the summer, the Spencers grow a full range of garden vegetables to sell, as well.
The Spencers also have branched out to start Local Folks Foods, a local company that makes a mushroom pasta sauce, vegetarian mushroom patties and mushroom ravioli.
Traders Point Creamery’s own products — milk, yogurt, ice cream, beef and award-winning cheeses — come from grass-fed cows that are free of growth hormones and antibiotics.
With food contamination scares in recent news accounts, consumers are flocking to Traders Point and other farmers markets.
Federal farm policy, however, makes it difficult for local growers to supply area supermarkets with produce.
The Spencers grow their produce on about 15 acres rented from Steve Spencer’s parents, Fred and Sandy Spencer, who grow corn and soybeans on about 100 acres.
Under current farm policy, the government subsidizes farmers who grow traditional crops, such as corn and soybeans, but does not subsidize farmers who grow fruits and vegetables. So, if the elder Spencers lease land to their son and daughter-in-law instead of using it for corn and soybeans, they lose money, they said.
“It’s more expensive for us then to farm because we want to find a way to pay back my parents,” Steve Spencer said. “And with grain prices being so high now, they lose even more money than just the subsidies.”
Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind., has been trying to reform federal farm policy for the past several years to address such concerns. Lugar’s press secretary, Andy Fisher, said Lugar wants farmers to decide what they grow, not the government.
Lugar voted against the Senate farm bill in December because it didn’t offer significant reform to current policy, he said. The bill is now in negotiations in the House and Senate conference committee. Fisher said he expects it will move out of committee sometime in April.

Eggnog in one basket

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Traders Point product eschews sweet stuff to create treat that’s perfect for holidays
By Traci Cumbay
Indianapolis Star correspondent
December 12, 2007
Fons Smits is mixing up eggnog in small batches at Traders Point Creamery. The result of his from-scratch mix of organic ingredients is frothy and only mildly sweet.
“We don’t make it so sweet, like the factory stuff,” said Smits, manager and cheese maker at Traders Point, 9101 Moore Road. He has kept the eggnog simple: “Look at the ingredients. There are only a couple there.” None of those are preservatives or artificial color or flavor, he said.
The purist’s approach is all well and good, but how’s the eggnog taste with whiskey?
“Pretty good,” Smits said. “Of course I had to try that. I blended it with about 7 percent whiskey for just a little kick, but someone else said, ‘No — it’s gotta be 50-50.’ ”
Look for the eggnog at the Farm Store at the Zionsville-area creamery or at any stores that carry its products. The eggnog is available in 32-ounce bottles until year’s end.

San Fran Chronicle applauds local cheese: "A new American cheese on a par with comparable cheeses from Europe"

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Friday, November 09, 2007


Back to Article
From Mt. Tam to Indiana
Janet Fletcher
Friday, November 9, 2007

It’s always a thrill to me to find a new American cheese on a par with comparable cheeses from Europe. Most American cheesemakers, understandably, have a learning curve, and the Europeans are a few centuries ahead. But Fons Smits, cheesemaker for the new Traders Point Creamery in Indiana, grew up in the Netherlands in dairy country and has all the relevant academic credentials for cheesemaking. During a stint in California, he helped Cowgirl Creamery create Mt. Tam, its popular aged cow’s milk cheese. Now, at Traders Point, an organic dairy in Zionsville, near Indianapolis, he has another success to his credit: the raw-milk Fleur de la Terre.
Traders Point Creamery opened its doors four years ago thanks to Fritz and Jane Kunz, a hand surgeon and his wife. Jane Kunz inherited the property, a defunct farm, and she and her husband decided to revive it to produce dairy products and grass-fed beef. I was impressed that, in their literature, the couple make no mention of themselves but talk at length about their Brown Swiss cows.
Smits began work on Fleur de la Terre (literally, “flower of the earth”) only a couple of years ago, so this is truly a cheese in its infancy. But what an impressive debut. “It’s a Dutch-style cheese, but I would not say it’s a Gouda,” says Smits. “We try to make it our own.”
Before I spoke to him, I was having a hard time comparing Fleur de la Terre to anything I knew. It is vaguely Gruyere-like, but not as nutty or sandy. Smits makes it only in spring and fall, when the cows are producing the most milk; in the summer, the milk goes to fresh dairy products, like yogurt and ice cream.
The raw milk is cultured and coagulated with non-animal rennet, then the curds are rinsed with warm water to rid them of lactose, or milk sugar. This step keeps the cheese’s acidity in check, because the culture would eventually convert lactose to lactic acid. The fresh curds are packed in molds, pressed for a few hours to make them more compact, and brined for a couple of hours to season them. Then they move to the aging room for four to six months.
Finished wheels of Fleur de la Terre weigh about 11 pounds. They have a hard, dry, clean rind, and a firm, butter-colored interior with a few small eyes. The aroma, oddly, reminds me of the fat on a lamb chop – an unexpected fragrance in a cow’s milk cheese, but appetizing nonetheless. The flavors are sweet, salty and mellow, the finish creamy if you let the cheese sit on your tongue. Smits has created a cheese with personality that doesn’t resemble anything else. I like it immensely.
Try Fleur de la Terre with whatever red wine you have nearby; you practically can’t go wrong. With its touch of sweetness, it’s also a nice match with an off-dry sherry.
Next up: Bleu de Sassenage, a cow’s milk blue cheese from France.
E-mail comments to jfletcher@sfchronicle.com.

Traders Point Creamery Aerial Photo

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Oktoberfest nets over $12,000 for Consultant

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Tuesday, November 20, 2007

On behalf of Greater Historic Traders Point, I would like to thank our neighborhood and community for their support of Oktoberfest which was designed to raise money for our Rural Historic District nominations. We had no idea the interest that there is in this project and in the preservation of greenspace. Your support is overwhelming! We netted just over $12,000 (and donations are still coming in!) and can now pay the remainder of the fee due to Camilla Fife (consultant) and fund some markers upon approval of the nominations! Most of all, though, it was great to see neighbors and friends enjoying our area and having fun on a gorgeous fall day!

We definitely were overwhelmed by the turnout on the day of Oktoberfest. In hindsight, there are items we could and should do differently, but we graciously admire and appreciate your patience and support of this event and, in turn, our goal of establishing two Rural Historic Districts.

Thank you for your time, for your donations, and, most of all, thank you for your friendships and for your love of our area!

Cindy Lamberjack

Creamery Named "travel gem" by Travel Writers

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Zionsville, IN – November 19, 2007 – Traders Point Creamery (www.traderspointcreamery.com), a family-owned, organic dairy farm and artisan creamery, has received the Midwest Travel Writers Association’s GEMmy Award, for true “travel gems”; unique destinations that offer an exceptional experience. Barbara E. Cohen and Peggy Sailors of the MTWA presented the award on November 13 to Jane Elder Kunz and Dr. Peter F. Kunz, Creamery owners.
“We’ve all worked hard to give visitors a true sense of dairy life, as well as the experience of delicious, fresh, organic foods,” said Jane Kunz. “People are usually surprised to find such wide open pastures and natural beauty just 15 minutes from downtown Indianapolis.”
Traders Point Creamery, located at 9101 Moore Road in Zionsville, is a working dairy farm with an on-site creamery production facility. Inside the 19th-century hand-hewn barn visitors can watch the production of award-winning yogurts and cheeses; enjoy a seasonal, organic lunch or dinner in the Creamery Cafe; savor fresh ice cream creations at the Dairy Bar; shop in the farm store; and visit the milking parlor to see the cows being milked daily around 4:00pm. Outside, visitors are welcome to tour the scenic farm, picnic on the deck, walk amongst free-range chickens, enjoy the view, and with luck, see the newborn calves in the Red Barn. The Creamery also hosts a year-round Farmers Market, featuring the seasons best from local small-scale growers and artisans.
About the Midwest Travel Writers Association (MTWA) Founded in 1951, MTWA is the oldest association of professional travel writers in the United States. The organization includes travel writers and public relations professionals who live in one of the 13 Midwestern states and specialize in the travel industry. The writers are published in major magazines and newspapers nationwide and have written numerous travel books. More information about MTWA, along with travel tips of interest to midwestern travelers, can be found at www.mtwa.org.
About Traders Point Creamery
Traders Point Creamery is a family owned artisan dairy located in Zionsville, Indiana. The company produces handcrafted cheeses including Fromage Blanc, Fromage Blanc spicy, Fromage Blanc garden herb, old-style cottage cheese, and “Fleur de la Terre,” a natural-rind, aged cheese which won the American Cheese Society’s 2007 First Place award for Best Farmstead Cheese. Its European-style yogurts include whole milk plain (American Cheese Society’s First Place winner for 2005 and 2006), low-fat vanilla, and flavors such as Wildberry (a combination of raspberry, blackberry & acai berry), Orchard Trio (made with pear, peach, and acerola cherry), Banana-Mango, Raspberry, and other seasonal favorites. The company also produces pure, fresh, unhomogenized whole milk, chocolate milk, and ice cream. The products are sold on-site at the Creamery Farm Store and weekly Farmers Market, and through select supermarkets, gourmet shops, and natural and organic food markets throughout the U.S.
Traders Point Creamery all natural, certified organic products are made from grass-fed milk, contain no artificial ingredients, coloring, flavors, preservatives or stabilizers, and all yogurts are made with live, active cultures which offer probiotic health benefits. Since Traders Point cows are raised exclusively on pasture and eat the rich, carefully cultivated greens, their milk acquires more nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), beta-carotene and vitamins A and E, than organic milk produced using standard feeds. Established in 2003, the Creamery is housed in a restored 19th-century hand-hewn barn on a family farm, which is certified organic by the USDA. The Traders Point herd of Brown Swiss cows spends all of its time roaming free on pastures, and never receives antibiotics or synthetic growth hormones. Synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or herbicides are never used on the land.

Traders Point Creamery

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Press Release
ZIONSVILLE, Ind.–Traders Point Creamery http://www.traderspointcreamery.com/, a family-owned, organic artisan dairy, announced today that its European-style, award-winning yogurts, in classic 32 oz. glass bottles, are now available in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, DC. Traders Point whole milk plain yogurt won the American Cheese Society’s prestigious First Place Awards in both 2005 and 2006, and the Second Place Award in 2007. With the addition of pure, organic fruit purees, it is also available in a variety of flavors.
Traders Point Creamery all natural, certified organic yogurts are made from grass-fed milk, contain no artificial ingredients, coloring, flavors, preservatives or stabilizers, and are made with live, active yogurt cultures which offer probiotic health benefits. Since Traders Point cows are raised exclusively on pasture and eat the rich, carefully cultivated greens, their milk acquires more nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), beta-carotene and vitamins A and E, than organic milk produced using standard feeds.
“People are starting to really look at where their food comes from, and how it was raised,” said Jane Elder Kunz, who owns the family farm and Creamery with her husband, Dr. Peter Kunz. “Grass-fed milk is rare these days, but it’s worth the extra effort because we’re passionate about producing truly healthful food. And now we use this milk to make a whole new style of delicious dairy products, based on centuries-old traditional Dutch recipes.”
The Creamery is managed by an artisan cheese maker who hails from the dairy region of Holland. His European training and tastes are reflected in the products, which have a distinctly unique fresh taste and silky texture. These pourable yogurts provide a healthy, delicious snack, and make an elegant dessert served with fresh fruit and a sprig of mint. They also add flavor and body poured on breakfast cereals and granola, or can be frozen into yogurt pops!
In addition to plain yogurt, the company also offers a low-fat vanilla yogurt, and organic fresh fruit purees are added to make flavors such as Wildberry (a combination of raspberry, blackberry & acai berry); Orchard Trio (made of pear, peach, and acerola cherry), Banana-Mango, and other seasonal favorites. Traders Point Creamery yogurts are sold through select supermarkets, gourmet shops, and natural and organic food markets at a suggested retail price of $6.49 per 32 oz. glass bottle.
Traders Point organic, grass-fed, unhomogenized chocolate milk is also available from select East Coast retailers, as is Fleur de la Terre, the company’s natural-rind, aged cheese which was awarded First Place for Farmstead Aged Cheeses at the American Cheese Society’s 24th Annual conference earlier this month.
About Traders Point Creamery
Traders Point Creamery is a family owned artisan dairy located in Zionsville, Indiana. The company produces pure, fresh, unhomogenized whole milk, chocolate milk, plain, vanilla and fruit yogurts, and ice cream. Handcrafted cheeses include Fromage Blanc, Fromage Blanc spicy, Fromage Blanc garden herb, old-style cottage cheese, and “Fleur de la Terre,” a natural-rind, aged cheese which won the American Cheese Society’s 2007 First Place award for Best Farmstead Cheese.
Established in 2003, the Creamery is housed in a restored 19th-century hand-hewn barn, on a family farm which is certified organic by the USDA. The Traders Point herd of Brown Swiss cows spends all of its time roaming free on pastures, and never receives antibiotics or synthetic growth hormones. Traders Point Creamery is very unique in that its dairy products are made from grass-fed organic milk, which provides a rich, natural source of omega-3 fatty acids and CLAs (conjugated linoleic acids). Synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or herbicides are never used on the land.
The company founders believe in “nourishing the land that nourishes us all.” This means preserving the family farm and continuing their grandparents’ legacy of sensible, sustainable, low-input agriculture. Their mission is to farm in harmony with the land and animals; produce the most nutritious and healthful products possible; and encourage education of sustainable farming and nutrition.
For more information about Traders Point Creamery and its products, visit http://www.traderspointcreamery.com or call (317) 733-1700.
Source: Traders Point Creamery